Tag Archives: African Caribbean

A solution to a underwhelming event

Recently, I was looking forward to going to a black event but this was dispelled as soon as I had entered the event.
There are several things which I will note:
  • The reception was not courteous
  • The leaflet had random pieces of information
  • No itinerary for the days events
  • No schedule for the speakers
  • The event information was a Facebook page
  • No activities for children
  • There was no menu
This could easily have been:
  • A warm welcome
  • Simple but effective design of a leaflet/flyer
  • A itinerary of what would be happening on the day
  • A schedule of the days events
  • Having a website as a first point of contact, with a Facebook page as a signpost
  • Speakers being on time
  • Activities for children
  • Food menu as it had a cafeteria
The effect of being more organised:
  • A value for money event
  • More support in future
  • A service which is worthwhile
  • More transparent operation
  • People who are capable of delivering a great event
  • Repeat custom
The event could have been cheaper, and the atmosphere considering the topic it was focused on could have been more welcoming and interactive. It is some thing which an event organiser may think about as well as the committee of the organisation.

A Pilot Campaign

Blacks who are creating projects should be looking at business and project management models, since they need to create something effective, efficient and sustainable to the lives of black people

I learned from as long time ago that a pilot project should be created before you get investment. Many businesses start of small and grow or show they have a following before they ask for investment or funding. This demonstrates to the investors that your idea is viable and it is what the people want. Its and example that action is more clearer than words. Some ideas are still funded or investment is provided if the initial venture has failed but the difference it can make with the right funding is great.

Some black people who crowdfund, have a service or product already which should be the point. Others want to start from zero. The crowdfunding campaigns, which are starting a project from zero will have a higher chance of not materialising, if no work has not started before the funding campaign started. There should be more clear plans and direction of the project at least and the market should be tested, not just through research but a prototype or as said above a small scale version of the project.

The main project/business can then be created, through having a business case which in summary shows:

  • The benefits 
  • The negative impact
  • The difference it will make

The most important aspect of the persons ideals should be the difference they can make as this can determine whether it will work. If you have no project already then its not likely you can see a practical benefit (no matter how small), rather than a theoretical one.

I follow this most of the time, but like anyone else if someone has a way with psychology and I believe I have done the checks to the best of my ability then I put my hands up, but I use it as a learning experience, just like you would.

Further Information

Indiegogo Guide to Crowdfunding

Shopify Guide to Crowdfunding

Inc.com guide to crowdfunding

Pilot Project Guide

Black People and Coffee Shops

For nearly a decade now I have been going to coffee shops in my spare time, at first it was to write poetry and just detox on a Saturday afternoon after a hard week of working. Then it got to the point where I would go sometimes during the week after work, whether it was with acquaintances, project proposals or on my lonesome.

I noticed at this point in my early to mid 20’s that I was one of a few UK born Africans who was interested in going to coffee shops just to chill. I used to wonder why our people did not go to coffee shops in the 2000’s but it is for similar reasons why some still do not go now (though I notice more people in them these days). They would rather make the drink at home, though a coffee shop should not be seen as just a place where you go to drink a coffee rather a place to socialise, develop ideas, relationships or just disappear.

I find 8 years later that there are more people going to coffee shops who are African/black as more people are realising what you can do in a coffee shop and what you can discuss, without pressure of the environment or time constraints to finish your drink.

The Europeans use coffee shops to socialise and chill with each other, its only the British who think going to the coffee shop is a upwardly mobile thing to do or have it as a treat. I have noticed that coffee shops are beginning to open later and so more people who are from backgrounds which do not drink or drink little alcohol are meeting friends and family in these places.

Black people could begin to be more sociable by meeting in these places, rather than thinking there are few places to go maybe just enjoying each others company in a place where you can have a warm drink or cool drink (in summer) might be a good place to get your personal and professional goals off the ground.

To finish, I often go to a couple of well known coffee shops as I am allergic to milk so I get the milk free options. I sometimes go to independent ones, though my favourite coffee shop which had a great atmosphere decided to expand and lost the atmosphere, that is not to say all coffee shops are like that. Though some coffee shops are family friendly with child seats, as others are work friendly with chairs and tables whilst one thing which is guaranteed in all is free WiFi.

Audio And Visual Plugging

Remembering back to the late 80’s and the early 90’s when
I would listen to pirate radio stations which would play
reggae and black music. These were ways in which black
people could play their music on the UK as the costs to
get a radio mast would be huge and for a Licence to play
songs this would be large too.

The radio stations still exist (on Analogue radio and as
internet radio stations) today in towns and cities across
the UK with a Afrocaibbean population. This is because we
originally created them to play our songs and music,
which would not be played on mainstream radio. Despite
them being illegal, many reggae artists do shout outs to
these radio stations, as they are channels which can be used to
bring more awareness of their music and songs.

The thing which these radio stations did which many of
the black people who talk about enlighted matters dont do
is promote local black owned businesses. As a kid when
recording these stations annoyance would set in as the
adverts would play but as a more enlightened adult I like
and understand the need for these adverts.

This links into the point of view that the enlightened
persons who provide information for black people should
have adverts on their audio and video posts for
businesses which are local or regional to them and some
of their following.

This will be useful to those with a large following and
the advertising would be for businesses which are
relevant to the demographic of the audience. On pirate
radio local black businesses advertise and you begin to
find out which businesses exist in that town or city and
also what events are going on locally and regionally.

As well as being able to provide opinions and information
you may also provide information on local businesses on
your videos and radio shows. The finer details in terms
of economic details for both parties are to be discussed
between yourselves.